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Lunchtime Lecture – Unlocking our Past to Free our Future: Two survivors of the Stolen Generations share their stories

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Lunchtime Lecture – Unlocking our Past to Free our Future: Two survivors of the Stolen Generations share their stories

N/A

Wednesday 19 June
1.15pm

FREE

In this Lunchtime Lecture Uncle James Michael ‘Widdy’ Welsh and Uncle Kerry Mckenzie, survivors of the Stolen Generation, will share their stories.

Between June 1924 and May 1970, authorities of the state of New South Wales incarcerated 400 – 600 Aboriginal boys (as well as a small number of girls in its first years) in Kinchela Boys Home. Uncle James Michael ‘Widdy’ Welsh and Uncle Kerry Mckenzie were kidnapped from their families and taken to Kinchela Boys Home and Clairvaux respectively. Australian society has long neglected to listen to these voices and this will be a unique opportunity to hear these two Uncles share their memories and the impact that their time in these “homes” had on them personally and the wider Aboriginal Australian communities.

“This is where we learnt we weren’t White. First of all they took you in through these iron gates and took our little ports (suitcases) off us. Stick it in the fire with your little Bible inside. They then took us around to a room and shaved our hair off. They gave you your clothes and stamped a number on them. They never called you by your name, they called you by your number. That number was stamped on everything.”
– Survivor of KBH

Product Description

Wednesday 19 June
1.15pm

FREE

In this Lunchtime Lecture Uncle James Michael ‘Widdy’ Welsh and Uncle Kerry Mckenzie, survivors of the Stolen Generation, will share their stories.

Between June 1924 and May 1970, authorities of the state of New South Wales incarcerated 400 – 600 Aboriginal boys (as well as a small number of girls in its first years) in Kinchela Boys Home. Uncle James Michael ‘Widdy’ Welsh and Uncle Kerry Mckenzie were kidnapped from their families and taken to Kinchela Boys Home and Clairvaux respectively. Australian society has long neglected to listen to these voices and this will be a unique opportunity to hear these two Uncles share their memories and the impact that their time in these “homes” had on them personally and the wider Aboriginal Australian communities.

“This is where we learnt we weren’t White. First of all they took you in through these iron gates and took our little ports (suitcases) off us. Stick it in the fire with your little Bible inside. They then took us around to a room and shaved our hair off. They gave you your clothes and stamped a number on them. They never called you by your name, they called you by your number. That number was stamped on everything.”
– Survivor of KBH