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Forum on Refugees and Asylum Seekers – An Evening with Thomas Keneally AO

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Forum on Refugees and Asylum Seekers – An Evening with Thomas Keneally AO

N/A

Wednesday 14 August
6pm

Tickets $20
Tickets available at the door

In this event, Thomas Keneally AO will explore the human rights of refugees and asylum seekers. Keneally is a renowned Australian author and ambassador for the Asylum Seeker Centre.

Tom recently co-authored the book A Country Too Far, the landmark anthology by 27 of Australia’s finest writers which confirms that experience of seeking asylum – the journey’s of escape from death, starvation, poverty or terror to an imagined paradise – is part of the Australian mindset and deeply embedded in our culture. This promises to be an evening of valuable discussion with one of Australia’s literary treasures.

Nibbles will be served prior to the event from 5:30pm.

Booking is essential.

 

Thomas Keneally AO

Thomas Keneally AO is one of Australia’s best known and most respected authors, writing both fiction and non-fiction. Born in 1935, he won the Booker Prize in 1982 with Schindler’s Ark, later made into the Academy Award-winning film Schindler’s List by Steven Spielberg. Tom’s fiction includes The Widow And Her Hero (shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Award), An Angel In Australia and Bettany’s Book. His novels The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith, Gossip from the Forest, and Confederates were all shortlisted for the Booker Prize, while Bring Larks and Heroes and Three Cheers For The Paraclete won the Miles Franklin Award. The People’s Train was longlisted for the Miles Franklin Award and shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers Prize, South East Asia division. As well as writing many novels, Tom has shown an increasing interest in producing histories. His history of Irish convictism was entitled The Great Shame and was published in all the English language markets. The same was true of his later work, The Commonwealth of Thieves, which looked upon the penal origins of Australia in a way which sought to make the reader feel close to the experience of individual Aboriginals, convicts and officials. Keneally has the won the Miles Franklin Award, the Booker Prize, the Los Angeles Book Prize, the Royal Society of Literature Prize, the Scripter Award of the University of Southern California, the Mondello International Prize and the Helmerich Prize.

Product Description

Wednesday 14 August
6pm

Tickets $20
Tickets available at the door

In this event, Thomas Keneally AO will explore the human rights of refugees and asylum seekers. Keneally is a renowned Australian author and ambassador for the Asylum Seeker Centre.

Tom recently co-authored the book A Country Too Far, the landmark anthology by 27 of Australia’s finest writers which confirms that experience of seeking asylum – the journey’s of escape from death, starvation, poverty or terror to an imagined paradise – is part of the Australian mindset and deeply embedded in our culture. This promises to be an evening of valuable discussion with one of Australia’s literary treasures.

Nibbles will be served prior to the event from 5:30pm.

Booking is essential.

 

Thomas Keneally AO

Thomas Keneally AO is one of Australia’s best known and most respected authors, writing both fiction and non-fiction. Born in 1935, he won the Booker Prize in 1982 with Schindler’s Ark, later made into the Academy Award-winning film Schindler’s List by Steven Spielberg. Tom’s fiction includes The Widow And Her Hero (shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Award), An Angel In Australia and Bettany’s Book. His novels The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith, Gossip from the Forest, and Confederates were all shortlisted for the Booker Prize, while Bring Larks and Heroes and Three Cheers For The Paraclete won the Miles Franklin Award. The People’s Train was longlisted for the Miles Franklin Award and shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers Prize, South East Asia division. As well as writing many novels, Tom has shown an increasing interest in producing histories. His history of Irish convictism was entitled The Great Shame and was published in all the English language markets. The same was true of his later work, The Commonwealth of Thieves, which looked upon the penal origins of Australia in a way which sought to make the reader feel close to the experience of individual Aboriginals, convicts and officials. Keneally has the won the Miles Franklin Award, the Booker Prize, the Los Angeles Book Prize, the Royal Society of Literature Prize, the Scripter Award of the University of Southern California, the Mondello International Prize and the Helmerich Prize.