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Lunchtime Lecture – Jews, concert music and Australia: Shaping a cultural landscape

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Lunchtime Lecture – Jews, concert music and Australia: Shaping a cultural landscape

N/A

Lunchtime Lecture – Jews, concert music and Australia: Shaping a cultural landscape

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Wednesday 29 May
1.15pm

FREE 

In this Lunchtime Lecture, music researcher Dr Joseph Toltz will survey the contribution that composers of Jewish origin have brought to Australian concert platforms, from colonial times to the present. Jews have played a role significantly disproportionate to their numbers in the Australian community. From colonial times to Federation, from assimilation, to assertions of cultural identity and commitments to an international style, musical artists of Jewish origin have shaped what we hear and see. Did their Jewish identity shape their creations?

Bio

Dr Joseph Toltz is a music researcher and administrator at the University of Sydney.  He is currently working on the first published collection of Holocaust songs, co-writing a stage work with a child-survivor of the Łódź Ghetto, working with the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna on the archive of the composer Wilhelm Grosz, and with the University of Akron, Ohio, on recordings made by Dr David Boder in Displaced Persons camps in mid-1946 in Europe.

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Wednesday 29 May
1.15pm

FREE 

In this Lunchtime Lecture, music researcher Dr Joseph Toltz will survey the contribution that composers of Jewish origin have brought to Australian concert platforms, from colonial times to the present. Jews have played a role significantly disproportionate to their numbers in the Australian community. From colonial times to Federation, from assimilation, to assertions of cultural identity and commitments to an international style, musical artists of Jewish origin have shaped what we hear and see. Did their Jewish identity shape their creations?

Bio

Dr Joseph Toltz is a music researcher and administrator at the University of Sydney.  He is currently working on the first published collection of Holocaust songs, co-writing a stage work with a child-survivor of the Łódź Ghetto, working with the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna on the archive of the composer Wilhelm Grosz, and with the University of Akron, Ohio, on recordings made by Dr David Boder in Displaced Persons camps in mid-1946 in Europe.